Tilford Conference Program

 

Download full program HERE (pdf).

Download large print program HERE (pdf).

 


Check In: 8:15am

Parlors Room, 5th Floor

Day-of registration also available. A light breakfast, coffee, and tea is available.

Registration tables will stay open until 2:00pm.

 


Conference Welcome

Ballroom, 5th Floor

Chancellor, Douglas A. Girod

Provost & Executive Vice Chancellor, Barbara A. Bichelmeyer

Interim Vice Provost for Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Belonging, D. A. Graham

Land Acknowledgement by Director of Tribal Relations and President of the Native Faculty Staff Council, Melissa Peterson

 


Session 1: 9:45am - 10:45am

An Unlikely Cross-Discipline Collaborative Research Project with Extraordinary Impact: Bonding through Books with Incarcerated Mothers and Grandmothers

Malott Room, 6th Floor

Sarah Broman Miller and April Terry

Fort Hays State University

The departments of Criminal Justice and Teacher Education share minimal academic overlap, with unlikely odds of interacting with one another, let alone work together on a project of such significant consequence. Yet, this is precisely what 31 students, spanning two academic departments, completed, in partnership with two faculty members and two community partners. This piloted undergraduate research project sought to simultaneously benefit students, alongside inmates, the prison system, and the children/grandchildren of incarcerated mothers/grandmothers through a read-aloud program and unexpectedly offered an important way for the incarcerated participants to connect with family during COVID 19. Furthermore, this project offered a glimpse of the devastating consequences of illiteracy and its prevalence in the incarcerated population. Some students were exposed to the process of research collection, analysis, and dissemination of findings, while other students provided tailored read-aloud tutoring sessions to complement their literacy and assessment experiences. The success of the pilot project has led to a continuation of the program which today involves nearly 50 incarcerated mothers and grandmothers and approximately 100 children and grandchildren. Other institutions can implement similar service-learning and research-based opportunities for students from multiple academic departments.

How collaborative recruiting can increase diversity in graduate STEM education and the U.S. workforce

Alderson, 4th Floor

Mirit Shamir, Dr. Zelia Z. Wiley, and Dr. Melanie Derby

Kansas State University

Broadening participation in graduate STEM education can increase diversity in the workforce, train women and underrepresented minority (URM) students for STEM careers, and enable the United States to thrive in the 21st century. To broaden participation, multiple collaborative recruiting strategies should be adapted. Our NSF Research Traineeship (NRT) program strives to broaden participation in STEM through multiple pathways. The NRT’s most successful recruitment strategies for broadening participation have been collaborating with university diversity administrators, and connecting NRT faculty and students to prospective students through Zoom meetings and email conversations. This collaboration has assisted the NRT in reaching out to students from different backgrounds and connecting them to NRT faculty and students. The K-State Research and Extension (KSRE) Summer Research Fellows program prepares undergraduate for graduate programs, including the NRT, by funding underrepresented students, thereby increasing retention. The NRT’s first and second cohorts comprised of 50% women and 50% men, which aligns with the national population but exceeds STEM undergraduates. The NRT’s first cohort comprised of one URM student while second and third cohorts comprised of 50% and 53.84% URM students, respectively; 97% of the KSRE summer fellows have agreed the program was beneficial to their academic and professional STEM careers.

Introduction to Native American Student Support

Jayhawk Room, 5th Floor

Lori Hasselman and Melissa Peterson

University of Kansas

Supporting Native American students in higher education requires a unique awareness around the needs of our students. Participants will learn about Native American students in higher education, the diversity amongst those students within Indian Country, and the responsibilities our institutions have to Native American students. This discussion will also highlight the investments KU has made as it relates to Native American Success Initiatives.

Re-viewing the "Unpacking Whiteness in the Workplace" workshop series

Kansas Room, 6th Floor

Sean Barker, Kim Conard, Brandy Ernzen, and Brian Moss

University of Kansas

This panel offers a facilitated discussion with the organizers of "Unpacking Whiteness in the Workplace," a three-part workshop series initiated and led by members of KU's Staff Senate Diversity and Inclusion Committee.   Through small group discussions, workshop attendees explore concepts of whiteness, privilege, marginalization, and anti-racism specific to working at KU and unpack how white privilege shapes office cultures that are oppressive to people with marginalized identities. In Fall 2018, the team began hosting in-person sessions for the first two parts of the series, drawing about 50 participants for each session. The group later developed a third session to promote active allyship. The team has now delivered the series over the past six semesters (though incompletely during the Spring 2020 semester), going virtual in Fall 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic and continuing to the current semester. In addition, the group has developed summer trainings for Staff Senators, often working with other social justice focused entities on campus, to encourage leadership that centers the concerns of the most marginalized. The goal of this panel is to encourage and inspire others to build similar ground-up programs that are staff-initiated and staff-led to promote grassroots change in our working environments.

Together, we're better - in six words 

Big 12 Room, 5th Floor

Reva C. Friedman

University of Kansas

Presentation Download (PDF)

In this session participants will learn about the power of narrative to shrink barriers, introduce possibilities for genuine connections, and spark hope. Stories of self uniquely blend left- and right-brained thinking. The act of creating a personal narrative can make a chaotic jumble of life experience make sense. However, traditional approaches to writing a personal essay can be cumbersome, and are too likely to result in expected platitudes. And when sensitive topics are the focus, sharing content and related emotions can become problematic.

This session offers an alternative. The Six Word Memoir Project was launched by Larry Smith, founder of SMITH Magazine, in November 2006. Smith claims that his inspiration derives from a popular anecdote (perhaps apocryphal) about Ernest Hemingway. Known for his terse prose, Hemingway was supposedly once challenged to write a novel in only six words. His result – “For sale: baby shoes, never worn.”

To date, this global project has published over 1.3 million life stories, contributed by a diverse population of 6-word novelists, spanning topics from “How I survived the pandemic” (contributed by University of Kansas faculty, to stories of immigration (“Fresh off the boat”). Novelists range from elementary school children to well-known celebrities. Weekly contests further invite involvement (for example, “Six words on a gender-balanced world”).

In this interactive session, participants will learn ABOUT this form of narrative, and HOW to write one. We will brainstorm ways in which to incorporate six-word memoirs into Diversity/Equity/Inclusion/Belonging, social and racial justice initiatives, and connections among diverse campus communities.

 

Session 2: 11:00am - 12:00pm

Administrator Roundtable for Executive Leaders

Kansas Room, 6th Floor

Panel moderated by Dr. D. A. Graham (University of Kansas). Featuring Dr. Teresa L. Clounch (Fort Hays State University), Dr. Marché Fleming-Randle (Wichita State University), and Be Stoney (Kansas State University).

In this session, we assemble a panel of Senior Diversity Officers to discuss their expansive roles in all areas of their organizations as a core driver of its educational imperative. In a candid conversation, these DEI leaders (Vice President and Assistant Vice President level) will discuss effective and transformative diversity, equity, and inclusion strategies and why they are required to meet the needs of students, staff, faculty and other stakeholders now more than ever.

Building Connection One READ at a Time

Malott Room, 6th Floor

Stephanie Spitz, Jorge Leon, Emely Monsour, John Franklin, and Jason Reid

Pittsburg State University

Tilford Readings for Empowerment and Diversity (READ) program started in 2019 as a pilot program to create a campus reader and has connected diverse campus constituents with one another through its ability of initiating meaningful conversations.  Every year the novel selected has shifted due to the needs and topics students and faculty/staff identify as timely and necessary to cover. As the content evolved, so did the platform in which to hold these conversations from in-person to virtual formats via Canvas and Zoom due to COVID-19. Our roundtable discussion includes a 5 minute highlight video of the 1st READ session that will share student testimony about the process. Further, we will also discuss the creation of OER book discussion study guides to better support facilitation of small group discussions. Participation’s conversation, advice, and connection is encouraged for this session.

Coalition Building Through Inclusive Pedagogy

Big 12 Room, 5th Floor

Valerie Mendoza, Angela Crumer, Erin Grant, Kristen Grimmer, and Jason Miller

Washburn University

Combining Washburn’s Center for Teaching’s strengths in pedagogy and the Title III grant’s knowledge of student needs, we devised a summer workshop on course redesign in 2020. This workshop produced spinoffs leading to a transformation of Washburn’s teaching culture and student success. Discussing personal finance in a math classroom is not culturally neutral. Students of color are less likely to use banks which can lead them to disengage with the topic. It is important to recognize and address this so each student can see themselves in the content. Crumer will discuss changes she made to this lesson and student response. Grimmer redesigned the upper-level course Media Law, Ethics and Diversity, a requirement for all students in the mass media major. She will discuss updates on inclusive-teaching methods for class materials, course content, and relationship-building teaching practices. An increasing number of faculty are implementing inclusive pedagogy to create a more equitable higher education experience. Faculty often struggle to find which approaches work best and do not consider conducting research on their teaching. In 2020, Grant and Miller created an Inclusive Pedagogies Research Group to support faculty to conduct research on inclusive learning in their classrooms and will reflect on this experience.

Session Cancelled. Women with Disabilities:  Invisibility within a Sexist & Ableist Society

Jody Fiorini

Wichita State University

Women with disabilities often experience a sense of invisibility in society and even within social justice movements around gender, socioeconomic status, LGBTQ status, and race. Disability policy was originally tailored to the needs of formerly working males – vocational emphasis focused on autonomy and independence.  This emphasis has left out issues of child rearing, sexuality, and women’s perspectives and voices in the disability movement. The result has been a dearth of information about women’s experiences with disability.  Information that does exist is frequently written by men from a man’s perspective. The presenter will provide information to attendees about inequities related to poverty, unemployment, segregation, loneliness, sexuality, and exploitation faced by women with disabilities and will discuss ways to advocate for women who experience disability.

 


Lunch & Keynote Address

Ballroom, 5th Floor

Lunch provided. Remarks from Kansas Board of Regents President & CEO, Blake Flanders. Keynote Address and Q&A with Rebecca Nagle.


Session 3: 1:45pm - 2:45pm

Assessment of Undergraduate Diversity Attitudes And Experiences during Covid-19 in the College of Agriculture at Kansas State University

Alderson, 4th Floor

Dr. Zelia Z Wiley, Dr. Andrew Barkley, Lonnie Hobbs Jr., Raymond Thomas, and Summer Samtillana.

Kansas State University

With the recent global health pandemic and as populations become more diverse, educational institutions have increased diversity programming for student success. Student openness to diversity and challenge has been found to have a large impact on changes in student attitudes, beliefs, and actions during acceptance to individual differences. This study uses regression analysis of survey data to measure (1) openness to diversity, and (2) diversity experience for students enrolled in the College of Agriculture at Kansas State University during the Fall Semester of 2020. Regression results indicate that student openness to diversity and challenge was found to be statistically associated with participation in diversity workshops, diversity class activities, and other personal and academic variables. The major implication of the statistical results is that there is an opportunity to influence student openness to diversity and challenge through enhanced programming for diversity appreciation and understanding as part of the university experience.  Understanding the connection between factors that affect openness to diversity can help to reveal the best practices for effectively influencing students in a positive way. This presentation will show the results and have activities to offer application for change.

Creating Sustainable and Impactful Native American Programs at KU

Jayhawk Room, 5th Floor

Melissa Peterson, Anthea Scouffas, Jancita Warrington, Matthew Gillespie, and Brandy Ernzen

University of Kansas

Participants will learn about the unique collaborations and the sustainable programming created to support Native American students, staff, faculty and community members at KU and in our community. Presenters will guide participants through the development of the foundational Native American program – the KU Powwow and Indigenous Cultures Festival – and how this event has grown and led to other programs and projects across campus. This discussion will include the process creating a committee that represents KU and Haskell students, faculty and staff, as well as Native American and non-Native American community members. We will also detail how this initial program has expanded into other dynamic programs that support our Native American students, faculty and staff while also educating our KU community, as well as our community at large. Most importantly, you will have a chance to ask questions and gain insight from current Native faculty, staff, and community members.

Did We Free Minds?: Lessons Learned from Co-facilitating an Anti-Racist Workshop Series for Faculty

Big 12 Room, 5th Floor

Muffy Walter and Keith Tatum

Washburn University

Presenters developed a ten-week faculty cohort workshop program from across their campus for growth in, and development of, anti-racist pedagogy. Essential elements for commitment to anti-racist journeys were highlighted: importance of leaning into discomfort, critical self-reflection, and connecting personal lives with professional lives as educators (Kendi, Love, Brookfield, Singleton). One goal of the pilot program was building coalitions within, and across, departments and schools; however, four main barriers for coalition building developed over these ten weeks: identity, attitude, diverse levels of knowledge, and specific instructional contexts. This interactive workshop, we include the co-facilitators reflections on the four barriers they faced, including some changes planned for this anti-racist pedagogy workshop program. In this workshop, the co-facilitators will share their experiences while also gaining insight from attendees. They will ask participants to investigate their individual identities and affects those may have in coalition building on their campuses. Additionally, participants will have an opportunity to collaborate in groups, perhaps even build coalitions within this workshop, creating strategies for building coalitions on college campuses, including anticipating barriers and ways to avoid or dismantle them.

Teaching Diversity Through Dance:  Theory & Practice

Kansas Room, 6th Floor

D. Nicole English

Fort Hays State University

Although academics feel that that teaching Diversity, Equality, and Inclusion (DEI) is important, how can we teach these ideas to students effectively?   Students often dread or resist coursework that addresses issues related to DEI.  One way is through teaching an embodied cultural practice, such as dance.  By teaching dance as an activity to students, with the goal of DEI in practice, one can see changes in student attitudes and behaviors in a matter of weeks.

Dance is an activity that most students find fun, and dance can be related to many different disciplines, including Physical Education, Theater, History, Sociology, Psychology, Political Science, Anthropology, Languages, and/or Culture.  Other activities could serve the same purpose.    The purpose of this presentation is to demonstrate how dance has been used as a strategy for teaching DEI, and its successes.  This demonstration could serve as a model for similar activities to teach DEI.  A theoretical basis will be presented to explain why this strategy works, as well as real-world examples of the strategy in practice.  Additionally, long-term data will be presented indicating the success of using dance as a strategy to teach DEI.  This presentation would be useful for any group which deals with students. 

The Gumbo Analysis of Diversity & Equity and Inclusion

Malott Room, 6th Floor

Dr. Marche Fleming-Randle

Wichita State University

The Gumbo Analysis of Diversity & Equity and Inclusion will give you a taste of DE&I that you can cook and serve others! This session aim to enhance participants’ abilities to gain adequate knowledge of differences, inequality, and problems in the post-COVID time and develop knowledge and skills to create resilience in educational settings by facilitating the diversity and inclusion work on campuses. The ingredients are a mix of skills, knowledge and abilities that will promote diversity, equity, and inclusion work and develop resilience in educational settings by building and maintaining coalitions.

 


Session 4: 3:00pm - 4:00pm

A Name for the Pain

Jayhawk Room, 5th Floor

Dr. Kevin Sylvester Harrison

Wichita State University

A Name for the Pain is an interactive workshop based on my dissertation by the same title.  We will discuss the emotional and psychological consequences of racial microaggressions on Black Boys in K-12 schools.  Since microaggressions are less noticeable than legal segregation or an angry mob yelling obscenities at the Little Rock Nine, this discrimination tends to go unnoticed, or is assumed to be benign. Black boys continue to underperform in core academic areas, while being overrepresented in special education and punitive actions.  With adult Black men continuing to experience gaps in education and wages, and overrepresentation in incarceration, it is no coincidence that school disparities mirror life disparities.  The school-to-prison pipeline is one example of this.  Excessive incarceration and over policing of Black men mirrors the excessive disciplinary measures waged against Black male students. We will utilize activities, group discussion, and role playing, as means of examining historic school racism, while challenging the idea that rather than school racism being a past idea, it has instead taking on new conceptions such as microaggressions – essentially creating segregated experiences within the walls of desegregated school buildings.   We will also discuss implicit bias, stereotypes, and factors that drive microaggressions.

Be ALL STAR! Situation, Action, Tasks, Results (STAR): Handling Tense Situations

Malott Room, 6th Floor

Dr. Abeni El-Amin

Fort Hays State University

Handling tense situations where employees or customers have made a sexist, racist, homophobic, or otherwise prejudiced remark requires skill and tact. An analysis of the role of leadership, grievance procedures, and the notion of 'resolution' within organizations is needed to understand group dynamics. An assessment of how racism is handled and what constitutes an acceptable outcome, especially from the person experiencing racism is also required in diversity paradigms. In terms of 'resolution,' it is important to ensure that apologizing is not a means of conflict avoidance, regardless of the status quo. Simultaneously, grievance procedures must not force the person who has experienced racism to accept an apology. Instead, an act of apology should be part of a broader process that addresses the nature and scale of bias, implicit bias, micro aggressions, and macro aggressions in the workplace. Therefore, utilizing the Situation, Action, Tasks, Results (STAR) method to reduce conflict is a method to reinforce positive cognitive behavior. Managers must understand the root cause of conflictual situations to determine conflict mitigation strategies. After obtaining evidence, managers are in the best position to recommend corrective action, mediation, litigation, or dismissal. The STAR method is traditionally utilized in the interview process but is easily translated to conflict mediation and mitigation. 

Let the Adventure Begin: A Collaborative Approach to Global Engagement and Accessibility

Kansas Room, 6th Floor

Tiphani Dixon, Kate Gerken, Charlie Ambrose, and Michelle Ward

University of Kansas

Study abroad is a natural conduit for DEI education. Although study abroad is often viewed as an inaccessible experience, our cross-unit collaboration has worked to dispel this myth and ensure that all elements of program execution--student recruitment, program development and on-site support are viewed with a DEI lens. We will discuss this unified effort to international education through the following topics:    Working with academic units to streamline the course approval process so students see it as a useful, integrative part of their education at KU. This includes short term programming, internships and on-campus international experiences, and mobile advising to meet students where they are.    Working with the Financial Aid office so students can use federal and institutional aid toward the cost of study abroad. We also maintain a list of affordable programs and scholarships for various underrepresented identities.    Collaboration with other student service units on campus such as Trio in joint student employment and program development, our integration with the Global Awareness program to reach students who would like an international experience but are not prepared to go abroad yet, and our partnership with Donnelly College, a Minority Serving Institution to inform study abroad programming and recruit underrepresented students.

Supporting and Understanding Faculty Development in Inclusive Pedagogy: Washburn University's Certificate of Inclusive Teaching and Learning

Big 12 Room, 5th Floor

Kelly Erby and Melanie Burdick

Washburn University

Washburn University’s Center of Teaching Excellence and Learning identified inclusive pedagogy as a focus of professional development programming since 2014, and in 2018–19 offered a Certificate in Inclusive Teaching and Learning to faculty who participated in at least nine professional development trainings. Trainings that were offered ranged from traditional workshops on topics such as Universal Design for Learning (UDL) to book study groups on titles such as Exploring Race in Predominantly White Classrooms (Yancey & Davidson, 2014). The trainings provided by C-TEL were based upon the following teaching and learning goals:

  • students’ diverse learning needs are incorporated into the teaching/learning process
  • students develop an appreciation for and understanding of the various cultures represented in the classroom
  • faculty teach to the perspectives and experiences of a diverse society
  • students learn to be sensitive to issues of power, privilege, and inclusion
  • faculty, staff, and students learn to recognize and respond to biases they may have developed over time
  • staff, faculty and students demonstrate sensitivity to evolving, unbiased terminology that refers to specific ethnic and cultural groups
  • staff, faculty and students develop intercultural competence that prepares them to live and work in a diverse and global community

This workshop will share results from a research study conducted with those who earned the certificate at Washburn. This study examined how faculty translate and implement training on inclusive teaching and results showed the importance of building coalitions across campus to provide the necessary support strategies to faculty pursuing inclusive, transformative teaching. Throughout the workshop, participants will create their own plan to help further the development of inclusive pedagogies at their institution and support faculty in becoming more inclusive teachers. 

Working together towards transformative Culture Change Through DEI Initiatives

Alderson Auditorium

Pedro Silva Espinoza, Mona Menking, Chloe Wurst, and Graciela Berumen

Kansas State University

Supreme Court decisions on affirmative action places the onus on colleges and universities to fundamentally and comprehensively link diversity and educational quality (AAC&U, n.d.). Academic units can serve as institutional change agents (Egan, 1985; Gravley-Stack et al., 2016) in creating a culture that proactively and assertively engages diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) both nationally and internationally. Connecting diversity and quality establishes DEI as a common culture within an institutional system. As a result, diversity, equity, and inclusion are considered “invaluable threads... woven throughout the fabric of institutional strategic plans (Worthington, et al., 2014, p. 228). A commitment to Inclusive Excellence (IE) provides an organizational framework to guide both institutional and collegial diversity initiatives. The Inclusive Excellence Change Model (IECM) provides a conceptual framework and intellectual backdrop for administrators, faculty, staff, and students to work collaboratively towards transformative culture change within higher education institutional settings (Williams et al., 2005). This presentation will 1) identify elements central to achieving excellence in local and global community engagement, aligning with DEI initiatives orchestrated by the Chief Diversity and Inclusion Officer (CDIO) and the Office of Diversity and Inclusion at Kansas State University, and 2) provide an inclusive space where individuals can build relationships with institutional peers, faculty, and staff in the process of articulating goals and priorities that directly support diversity and equity.

 


Networking & Social Hour

Ballroom, 5th Floor

Light food and drinks will be provided.